Suburb profile – Wahroonga

The garden suburb

Coonanbarra Road, Wahroonga

Origin of Wahroonga

Thomas Hyndes was convicted for life at the Surrey Assizes on 11 August 1800 and pardoned in 1808. He was one of the original grantees of land at Wahroonga, leasing 2000 acres from 1822 and receiving a grant of 640 acres in 1838.
Thomas Hyndes was convicted for life at the Surrey Assizes on 11 August 1800 and pardoned in 1808. He was one of the original grantees of land at Wahroonga, leasing 2000 acres from 1822 and receiving a grant of 640 acres in 1838.

Wahroonga was first settled in 1822 by the convict turned wealthy landowner, Thomas Hyndes. The establishment of the railway in Wahroonga attracted many wealthy businessmen who built large residences on large blocks of land, and to this day that remains the case, earning a reputation as one of Sydney’s most exclusive areas.

Location

Wahroonga is your last stop before you hit the Hornsby shire council area to the North West. Bounded by the Pacific Freeway, Turramurra, Warrawee and the Lane Cove River.

Demographics

By 2011 the Australian Census showed that the population of Wahroonga was 16 715, showing a growth rate of 17% during that time. The land size of homes and close proximity to many great schools attracts many young families, with the majority age bracket in Wahroonga being between 0 and 14.

Type of Dwellings

Wahroonga is known as a garden suburb, with tree lined streets, impressive homes and large blocks of land. Like its neighbouring suburbs, recent years has seen many unit blocks erected along the Pacific Highway and near the train line, as the high density wave from Sydney spreads across surrounding suburbs. Yet Wahroonga retains its great mix of Federation, Georgian and Californian Bungalow style homes and large land blocks. So if you are after a leafy, family suburb with big backyards, Wahroonga is your place.

The median house price in Wahroonga is close to $1 200 000 and the median apartment price is $650 000.

Transport

40 minutes by train from Wahroonga station and a bit over 30 minutes by car, traffic pending. Wahroonga is located 22 kilometres North-West of the Sydney CBD. As a result, commuting times begin to be a bit much for some, but Wahroonga generously compensates by being a safe, leafy, affluent area with large properties, hailed by many as a great location to raise children.

Shopping

The Wahroonga shops are located between Wahroonga station and the Pacific Highway. One thing is for sure, if you are after a great meal you’ll find one and you definitely won’t leave hungry, as Wahroonga shops is home to many gourmet eateries. There is also a super market, post office and a bank.

Hornsby Westfield is less than 10 minutes away by car, far enough away to not overbear the suburb, but close enough for convenience.

Schools

Annual Knox Grammar vs Barker College rugby match.
Annual Knox Grammar vs Barker College rugby match.

This is where Wahroonga truly shines. Wahroonga is home to Knox Grammar and Abbotsleigh, both highly regarded private schools on the North Shore. A few minutes down the road in Waitara you will find Barker College, another highly regarded North Shore Private school. Other schools in Wahroonga include:

  • Wahroonga Public school, aka, the Bush school.
  • Wahroonga Preparatory school.
  • Wahroonga Adventist school.
  • Prouille Catholic Primary school

Close by you will also find St Leos Catholic College, Normanhurst Boys High school and Loreto Normanhurst Girls school.

Local Parks

Wahroonga has a large central park that seems to be always buzzing with people. Good news for parents, the fenced playground and tempting trees to climb will keep the kids entertained and you can grab something from the café just across the road. The gardens are manicured and complimented by a rotunda, romantic enough to even attract weddings.

Other park venues in Wahroonga, such as the Glade offer tennis courts, basketball courts and sporting fields.

Article source: CENTURY 21 Australia

About Mike Coles 354 Articles
As publisher and chief content contributor to The Kuringai Examiner, I have an interest in all things on the North Shore, particularly news, sport and food. I'm always on the outlook for something unique and original to bring to my readers.